Tor is released

Tor is the first release candidate in the 0.2.7 series. It contains numerous usability fixes for Ed25519 keys, safeguards against several misconfiguration problems, significant simplifications to Tor's callgraph, and numerous bugfixes and small features.

This is the most tested release of Tor to date. The unit tests cover 39.40% of the code, and the integration tests (accessible with "make test-full-online", requiring stem and chutney and a network connection) raise the coverage to 64.49%.

NOTE: This is a release candidate. We think we've squashed most of the bugs, but there are probably a few more left over.

Changes in version - 2015-09-25

  • Major features (security, hidden services):
    • Hidden services, if using the EntryNodes option, are required to use more than one EntryNode, in order to avoid a guard discovery attack. (This would only affect people who had configured hidden services and manually specified the EntryNodes option with a single entry-node. The impact was that it would be easy to remotely identify the guard node used by such a hidden service. See ticket for more information.) Fixes ticket 14917.
  • Major features (Ed25519 keys, keypinning):
    • The key-pinning option on directory authorities is now advisory- only by default. In a future version, or when the AuthDirPinKeys option is set, pins are enforced again. Disabling key-pinning seemed like a good idea so that we can survive the fallout of any usability problems associated with Ed25519 keys. Closes ticket 17135.

  read more »

Tor is released

This, the second alpha in the Tor 0.2.7 series, has a number of new features, including a way to manually pick the number of introduction points for hidden services, and the much stronger Ed25519 signing key algorithm for regular Tor relays (including support for encrypted offline identity keys in the new algorithm).

Support for Ed25519 on relays is currently limited to signing router descriptors; later alphas in this series will extend Ed25519 key support to more parts of the Tor protocol.

If you typically build Tor from source, you can download the source code from the usual place on the website.
Packages should be up in a few days.

Changes in version - 2015-07-27
  • Major features (Ed25519 identity keys, Proposal 220):
    • All relays now maintain a stronger identity key, using the Ed25519 elliptic curve signature format. This master key is designed so that it can be kept offline. Relays also generate an online signing key, and a set of other Ed25519 keys and certificates. These are all automatically regenerated and rotated as needed. Implements part of ticket 12498.
    • Directory authorities now vote on Ed25519 identity keys along with RSA1024 keys. Implements part of ticket 12498.
    • Directory authorities track which Ed25519 identity keys have been used with which RSA1024 identity keys, and do not allow them to vary freely. Implements part of ticket 12498.
    • Microdescriptors now include Ed25519 identity keys. Implements part of ticket 12498.
    • Add support for offline encrypted Ed25519 master keys. To use this feature on your tor relay, run "tor --keygen" to make a new master key (or to make a new signing key if you already have a master key). Closes ticket 13642.
  • Major features (Hidden services):
    • Add the torrc option HiddenServiceNumIntroductionPoints, to specify a fixed number of introduction points. Its maximum value is 10 and default is 3. Using this option can increase a hidden service's reliability under load, at the cost of making it more visible that the hidden service is facing extra load. Closes ticket 4862.
    • Remove the adaptive algorithm for choosing the number of introduction points, which used to change the number of introduction points (poorly) depending on the number of connections the HS sees. Closes ticket 4862.

  read more »

Tor is released

Hi, all! There's a new stable Tor release out, and source code is now available on the website. If you build Tor from source code, you'll want to upgrade. Otherwise, packages should be available reasonably soon.

Remember to check signatures! (See the FAQ for information how)

Tor version fixes some significant stability and hidden service client bugs, bulletproofs the cryptography init process, and fixes a bug when using the sandbox code with some older versions of Linux. Everyone running an older version, especially an older version of 0.2.6, should upgrade.

Changes in version - 2015-07-12

  • Major bugfixes (hidden service clients, stability):
    • Stop refusing to store updated hidden service descriptors on a client. This reverts commit 9407040c59218 (which indeed fixed bug 14219, but introduced a major hidden service reachability regression detailed in bug 16381). This is a temporary fix since we can live with the minor issue in bug 14219 (it just results in some load on the network) but the regression of 16381 is too much of a setback. First-round fix for bug 16381; bugfix on
  • Major bugfixes (stability):
    • Stop crashing with an assertion failure when parsing certain kinds of malformed or truncated microdescriptors. Fixes bug 16400; bugfix on Found by "torkeln"; fix based on a patch by "cypherpunks_backup".
    • Stop random client-side assertion failures that could occur when connecting to a busy hidden service, or connecting to a hidden service while a NEWNYM is in progress. Fixes bug 16013; bugfix on

  read more »

Tor is released

Hi, I've just put out a new stable Tor release. It is not a high-urgency item for most clients and relays, but directory authorities should upgrade. Right now, the source is available on the website, and packages should become available one their maintainers build them.

Tor fixes a bit of dodgy code in parsing INTRODUCE2 cells, and fixes an authority-side bug in assigning the HSDir flag. All directory authorities should upgrade.

Changes in version - 2015-05-21
  • Major bugfixes (hidden services, backport from
    • Revert commit that made directory authorities assign the HSDir flag to relay without a DirPort; this was bad because such relays can't handle BEGIN_DIR cells. Fixes bug 15850; bugfix on tor-
  • Minor bugfixes (hidden service, backport from
    • Fix an out-of-bounds read when parsing invalid INTRODUCE2 cells on a client authorized hidden service. Fixes bug 15823; bugfix on
  • Minor features (geoip):
    • Update geoip to the April 8 2015 Maxmind GeoLite2 Country database.
    • Update geoip6 to the April 8 2015 Maxmind GeoLite2 Country database.

Tor is released

Tor is the first alpha release in its series. It includes numerous small features and bugfixes against previous Tor versions, and numerous small infrastructure improvements. The most notable features are several new ways for controllers to interact with the hidden services subsystem.

You can download the source from the usual place on the website. Packages should be up in a few days.

NOTE: This is an alpha release. Please expect bugs.

Changes in version - 2015-05-12
  • New system requirements:
    • Tor no longer includes workarounds to support Libevent versions before 1.3e. Libevent 2.0 or later is recommended. Closes ticket 15248.
  • Major features (controller):
    • Add the ADD_ONION and DEL_ONION commands that allow the creation and management of hidden services via the controller. Closes ticket 6411.
    • New "GETINFO onions/current" and "GETINFO onions/detached" commands to get information about hidden services created via the controller. Part of ticket 6411.
    • New HSFETCH command to launch a request for a hidden service descriptor. Closes ticket 14847.
    • New HSPOST command to upload a hidden service descriptor. Closes ticket 3523. Patch by "DonnchaC".

  read more »

Tor is released

Tor fixes an issue in the directory code that an attacker might be able to use in order to crash certain Tor directories. It also resolves some minor issues left over from, or introduced in, Tor or earlier.

If no serious issues are found in this release, the next 0.2.6 release will make 0.2.6 the officially stable branch of Tor.

You can download the source from the usual place on the website. Packages should be up in a few days.

NOTE: This is an alpha release. Please expect bugs.

Changes in version - 2015-03-09
  • Major bugfixes (crash, OSX, security):
    • Fix a remote denial-of-service opportunity caused by a bug in OSX's _strlcat_chk() function. Fixes bug 15205; bug first appeared in OSX 10.9.
  • Major bugfixes (relay, stability, possible security):
    • Fix a bug that could lead to a relay crashing with an assertion failure if a buffer of exactly the wrong layout is passed to buf_pullup() at exactly the wrong time. Fixes bug 15083; bugfix on Patch from "cypherpunks".
    • Do not assert if the 'data' pointer on a buffer is advanced to the very end of the buffer; log a BUG message instead. Only assert if it is past that point. Fixes bug 15083; bugfix on

  read more »

A new alpha series begins: Tor is released

Tor is the first release in the Tor 0.2.6.x series. It includes numerous code cleanups and new tests, and fixes a large number of annoying bugs. Out-of-memory conditions are handled better than in 0.2.5, pluggable transports have improved proxy support, and clients now use optimistic data for contacting hidden services. Also, we are now more robust to changes in what we consider a parseable directory object, so that tightening restrictions does not have a risk of introducing infinite download loops.

This is the first alpha release in a new series, so expect there to be bugs. Users who would rather test out a more stable branch should stay with 0.2.5.x for now.

This announcement is for the source release only; I'd expect that compiled packages for several platforms should be available over the next several days.

Changes in version - 2014-10-30
  • New compiler and system requirements:
    • Tor 0.2.6.x requires that your compiler support more of the C99 language standard than before. The 'configure' script now detects whether your compiler supports C99 mid-block declarations and designated initializers. If it does not, Tor will not compile.

      We may revisit this requirement if it turns out that a significant number of people need to build Tor with compilers that don't bother implementing a 15-year-old standard. Closes ticket 13233.

    • Tor no longer supports systems without threading support. When we began working on Tor, there were several systems that didn't have threads, or where the thread support wasn't able to run the threads of a single process on multiple CPUs. That no longer holds: every system where Tor needs to run well now has threading support. Resolves ticket 12439.

  read more »

Tor is released! (and Tor 0.2.3.x is deprecated)

Tor is the first stable release in the 0.2.5 series.

It adds several new security features, including improved denial-of-service resistance for relays, new compiler hardening options, and a system-call sandbox for hardened installations on Linux (requires seccomp2). The controller protocol has several new features, resolving IPv6 addresses should work better than before, and relays should be a little more CPU-efficient. We've added support for more OpenBSD and FreeBSD transparent proxy types. We've improved the build system and testing infrastructure to allow unit testing of more parts of the Tor codebase. Finally, we've addressed several nagging pluggable transport usability issues, and included numerous other small bugfixes and features mentioned below.

This release marks end-of-life for Tor 0.2.3.x; those Tor versions have accumulated many known flaws; everyone should upgrade.

Below we list all changes in since the 0.2.4.x series; for a list of changes in individual alpha releases, see the ChangeLog. read more »

Changes in version - 2014-10-24

Tor misused by criminals

Tor misused by criminals

Several people contacted The Tor Project recently because some software told them to install the Tor Browser to access a website. There is no affiliation between the criminals who wrote this software and Tor.

What happened here?

The computer is probably infected with what's called ransomware. This is a kind of malicious software which restricts access to the files and demands a ransom. In this case the authors of the ransomware CryptoLocker set up a website which is only reachable by using Tor. That is why people are thinking that the software is somehow related to The Tor Project.

In fact, CryptoLocker is unrelated to The Tor Project. We didn't produce it, and we didn't ask to be included in the criminal infection of any computer. We cannot help you with your infection. However, according to the BBC you may be able to decrypt your files for free. If not, Bleeping Computer can provide more information.

We, the people of Tor, are very sorry to hear that some individual misused the anonymity granted by our service. The vast majority of our users use Tor in a responsible way. Thank you for your understanding.

Advisory: remote DoS when using Tor with recent OpenSSL versions built with the "no-ssl3" option

This is a copy of the message Nick Mathewson sent to the tor-talk & tor-relays mailing lists.

Hello, relay operators!

There's one important bugfix in the release that relay operators should know about. If you have a version of OpenSSL that came out last week (like 1.0.1j, 1.0.0, ) and if your version of OpenSSL is built with the "no-ssl3" flag, then it's possible to crash your Tor relay remotely if you don't upgrade to or to (when that's out).

This appears to be an OpenSSL bug. The Tor releases in question contain a workaround for it.

To tell if your version of OpenSSL was built with 'no-ssl3': run:

openssl s_client -ssl3 -connect

If it gives you output beginning with something like:

140632971298688:error:14094410:SSL routines:SSL3_READ_BYTES:sslv3
alert handshake failure:s3_pkt.c:1257:SSL alert number 40
140632971298688:error:1409E0E5:SSL routines:SSL3_WRITE_BYTES:ssl
handshake failure:s3_pkt.c:596:

then you're fine and you don't need to upgrade Tor on your relay. But if it says something that starts with:

unknown option -ssl3
usage: s_client args

then you need to upgrade Tor.

Some questions and answers:

Q: Does this affect clients?
A: No. Only relays.

Q: Does this affect me if I'm running a version of OpenSSL other than 1.0.1j, 1.0.0o, or 0.9.8zc?
A: No. Only those versions.

Q: Does this affect me if I'm running a version of OpenSSL configured without the "no-ssl3" option?
A: No. Only versions that were built with the "no-ssl3" option are affected.

Q: Does the OpenSSL team know?
A: Yes. Have a look at this thread. Also, before I saw that thread, I informed them the other day.

Q: Does this affect Tor packages?
A: I don't think that we shipped any packages where we used the "no-ssl3" flag to diable ssl3. So only if you're using OpenSSL from another source (say, your operating system) will you be affected.

Q: What can I do to remediate this problem?
A: You can upgrade to the most recent Tor, or you can use a version of OpenSSL built without the "no-ssl3" flag. Downgrading your OpenSSL is not recommended.

Q: What is the potential impact of this bug?
A: If a relay is affected by this bug, anybody can make the relay crash remotely. It does not enable any data leaks or remote code execution. Still, the ability to selectively disable relays might enable a sophisticated attacker to do some kinds of traffic analysis more efficiently. So, fix your relay if it's affected.

Q: Should we run in circles and freak out?
A: Not this time. We should just make sure we fix affected relays.

Q: Hey, Nick, you didn't explain this properly!
A: Please send a follow-up message that explains it better. :)

Syndicate content Syndicate content