Facebook and Tor

A number of users have noticed that Facebook is blocking connections from the Tor network. Facebook is not blocking Tor deliberately. However, a high volume of malicious activity across Tor exit nodes triggered Facebook's site integrity systems which are designed to protect people who use the service. Tor and Facebook are working together to find a resolution.

For further questions please contact us at execdir@torproject.org.

Update from Facebook on June 18, 2013, 2:30 PM EST: Facebook's site integrity systems detected automated malicious activity coming from a significant number of Tor exit nodes. In order to protect people while we investigated the problem, access via these nodes was temporarily suspended. This issue has now been resolved and Tor access routes to Facebook restored.

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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Hello,
That's awful error and Facebook send an email and suggest use other proxy program....
I use obfs bridge proxy and I think this a good and more secure to bypass filtering on Iran

Thanks,

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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Works fine for me - just logged on to facebook from Tor. Probably just one exit router.

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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You just contradicted yourself: "However, a high volume of malicious activity across Tor exit nodes triggered Facebook's site integrity systems which are designed to protect people who use the service."

They're designed to block Tor traffic amongst many other types of traffic they don't want. There's no surprise here. I wouldn't allow Tor logins to my site at all. Just don't pretend like this was an innocent mistake by facebook. That's why they have the system in the first place!

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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Yeah, I can't imagine that Facebook is doing this intentionally - they like being able to hold up the fact that political dissenters use them for "freedom related purposes" - I would imagine that, if anything, we should be looking at what caused the malicious activity on Tor, that triggered the automatic site integrity systems.

As we well know, several military organizations control large amounts of Tor exit nodes. They, not Facebook, would have more to gain by limiting political dissenters' communications.

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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Thanks a lot for representing our interests.

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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I noticed this too, and was deeply concerned, especially as it comes in the backdrop of the recent NSA revelations. Very pleased to hear Facebook is not censoring the censored by doing the oppressive governments' dirty work for free! Activists in these countries desperately need all the support they can get to stifle any attempt at oppression made against them.

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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Could you also work with Google to resolve the issue of not being able to search the internet anonymously?!

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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It's using Tor to access facebook a bit like walking into a store with a mask on then handing over your birth certificate, drivers license, marriage certificate, bank card and pin number just to buy something?

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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ok

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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What about twitter? I have never been able to use a twitter account I created using tor.

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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yay

Anonymous

June 18, 2013

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Why are people trying to access facebook through tor? Wouldn't that defeat the purpose?

Anonymous

June 19, 2013

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Yes we scan but the Germans too and even better while blocking TOR-Exit.

I just want to let you know. I very reacently get a bad experience of the free mailer gmx.ch,*.net, *.de etc. A friend has asked me for help opening a new mail account with gmx. I first has insist that this would not be a very good idea. However, during the registring it is NOT possible to use any most of many anonymizing services while they also blocking most TOR-Exist Nodes. Just to make it clear. For registering with GMX anyone have to give name, address, birthday and a mobile number to receive a registering code by SMS. After that gmx obviously don't care the way how people use gmx-services and therfore TOR and all other anonymizers seems to work normal. Well, this is because they now you very clear. Your IP together with your name, address, Mobilephone, age etc.

Anonymous

June 19, 2013

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Thanks for letting us know.

But I won't be using Facebook, Twitter and any other US-based or US internet companies any time soon. They have betrayed our trust by working hand in glove with the NSA.

Why should we continue to support them to the detriment of our own safety? We aren't even US citizens or living in the US!

Anonymous

June 19, 2013

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"Tor and Facebook are working together to find a resolution" - means Tor will support NSA Prism surveillance program?

Anonymous

June 20, 2013

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What about google then? Are you guys working with them to help solve the google "screen of death" issue (blocking with no captcha page)? And by way of explanation, why can't these sites just put up a captcha page when they detect any kind of major spamming event instead of the wholesale blocking of all tor nodes, which seems unnecessary?

cos they ARE at war with all of you. How many programs on YOUR computer makes regular autoupgrade? first upgrade to scan and collect, second to remove scanner. Its that simple!

Worse, they are suddenly disabling Gmail accounts which connect from Tor exit nodes and requiring reactivation via telephone after each Tor login. Perhaps this is ostensibly for a similar reason. But, either way, the timing is a bit suspect, what with their recent media fallout.

Closing the connection via Vidalia (select the connection and press del on the network map) and reloading the page works most of the time for me. I hope the new browser bundle (3.x) will contain a viable alternative to vidalia and not just a dumbed down browser extension.

Anyways: Kudos to the developers for their work.

Anonymous

June 21, 2013

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Because ultimately...deep down...these sites don't actually want you to access their servers through any type of anonymiser (Tor, i2p, freenet, whatever). Their entire LIVELYHOOD comes revolves around:
A) you connecting from your actual location;
B) you prviding them with untold amounts of personal data, and;
C) selling that information, in all its forms, to the highest bidder.

The fact that Facebook is willing to work with Tor at all stems not from some altruistic, moral imperative but in hopes that you (general you) will still provide PII (Personally Identifiable Information) when connected via Tor.

ANY belief that Facebook is doing it for any other reason flawed at its core.

Anonymous

June 21, 2013

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Seems to me that you have some serious problems. Are you really thinking this through?

You keep working with Facebook and Google? Do you actually forward traffic to the NSA as well? Are you surprised when people say that Tor is a "honeypot"?

Anonymous

June 21, 2013

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Not to mention, you claim to oppose censorship, but your own blog only allows comments after they've been screened? What the hell?

Anonymous

June 22, 2013

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Unblock

Anonymous

June 22, 2013

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Any news about getting Pidgin back to the Tor Bundle? I read there were some problems related to DNS leaks, but they were limited to few (if not just one) of the IM services supported by Pidgin. Why not simply using a custom Pidgin version without those services? Something is better than nothing.

Anonymous

June 22, 2013

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One amusing side effect of tor to access Astro Empires : you can't see the timers.

Is this an effect of java?

Anonymous

June 23, 2013

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1

cpu string in a close tunnel with hash code along whole string,
no end feeder and no exit code an endles chain of infomation only excessable by input/output
code use by user once ,
p2p in a close loop accessable by all,
and no defined strings to be track back.
2

Anonymous

June 23, 2013

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Tested FB use through the Tor network on June 22nd. After passing the captcha parts etc. I ended up with the page asking me to verify the account by providing a mobile phone number.

So much for anonymity in FB. :(

Anonymous

June 23, 2013

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cool

Anonymous

June 24, 2013

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Speaking of social networking, what is the best way to use Twitter via Tor? I don't want to disable noscript and potentially reveal my location but I can't seem to use it without JavaScript. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Anonymous

June 25, 2013

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I dont get how you can seriously consider cooperating with google, facebook etc. could lead anywhere: this simply is a scheme to uphold the picture of independent companies. these arent free companies but government assets: their whole concept is surveillance to be evaluated by secret services - that is the solemn purpose of these institutions. we dont live in democratic systems anymore but corporate capitalism. politics and industry have completely merged. hearing about cooperation with these institutions gives me a really bad feeling about the future safety of tor....

Anonymous

June 25, 2013

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Google's problem (just speaking out my bum here, not a Google employee) is probably related more to their advertisement providers- their actual customers- than to searchers.

If the problem was protecting searchers from mass rank alterations attempts via Tor, they could just disable search rank alterations based on the detected client's browsing rather than disable access period. Certainly they already use methods similar to that in other situations where mass rank alteration attempts are detected. But again, not a Google employee.

Anonymous

June 26, 2013

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If NSA has active MITM intercept systems, how would we know about it?
How would this look like?
Can someone design a method to detect/verify if this is the case?

Anonymous

June 26, 2013

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So - how do we know that you Tor "people" are not collaborating with the Google/Facebook "people" & by that definition - the U.S. Government/NSA/PRISM "people" - to "rat-out" our identities?

There must be some "back-doors"/"decryption keys" for these Tor bundles to help all of them - right? :-))

Anonymous

June 27, 2013

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Facebook and the NSA can both kiss my ass. I'd prefer you not work with them.

Anonymous

June 28, 2013

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if you work with facebook you work with the nsa. why do i bother using tor at all

Anonymous

June 30, 2013

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Google isn't as important, as you can use other search engines. I believe Startpage provides Google results. I like DuckDuckGo.
They could probably use captchas, but they might assuming that each user has a different IP.

Unfortunately Google is very important, in fact, indispensable for vast amounts of hoarded information, which it holds and no one else does. Startpage only provides very limited google results in a few areas--it doesn't even offer access to googlebooks etc. They can easily improve their captcha responses. I fear they just don't want to, and prefer to keep out anonymous traffic in practice, while hypocritically claiming otherwise. It's a big issue, and short of google changing its private policies on the matter, it results in a de facto effort to steal data on the one hand (something the US is very good at) while attacking people's privacy on the other (another vital piece of US policy--no privacy, no immunity. No immunity, no resistance to US colonization/globalization). You should be far more concerned.