Help Tor Find a New Executive Director

The Tor Project is continuing its world-wide search for our new Executive Director. We need your help to find this person, whether they work for a nonprofit organization, for a tech company, at a university, for an open software project, or somewhere else entirely. We are open to candidates from lots of different backgrounds.

Here's a link to our original blog post with many more details, including how to submit candidates: Tor Project Launches Worldwide Search for a New Executive Director

An excerpt:

"The Tor Project, one of the world’s strongest advocates for privacy and anonymous, open communications is currently seeking an experienced Executive Director to lead the organization. The new Executive Director will spearhead key initiatives to make the organization even more robust in its work to advance human rights and freedoms by creating and deploying anonymity and privacy technologies, advancing their scientific and popular understanding, and encouraging their use."

Please take a moment to consider whether you know a candidate, likely or unlikely, who might be a great fit for this position.

Thanks!

Anonymous

October 21, 2015

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Whats up With Tor new s letter ??? I Miss it, as it kinda keep s me up to date, with Tor..... Miss the Bi- Monthly new s ... Thanks for all work to keep Freedom Free...

Anonymous

November 03, 2015

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@ Tor Project leaders:

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network is urging bankers filing SARs (Suspicious Activity Reports) to check whether any IPs seen are Tor nodes, and to include a DarkNet tag if so. See

https://publicintelligence.net/fincen-tor-cybercrime/

Note that FINCEN explicitly regards each Tor node (including non exit nodes) as a target.

(In the document, BSA means "Bank Secrecy Act". AML means "Anti-Money-Laundering".)

Anonymous

November 06, 2015

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One of the most important interview questions for candidates is: "How would you handle Gamergate type controversies"? Preceded by: "How much do you know about disruption tactics practiced by GCHQ and some of our other enemies?"

Case in point is the unfortunate claim by Eric Raymond described in this story:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/11/06/linus_torvalds_targeted_by_hone…
Linus Torvalds targeted by honeytraps, claims Eric S. Raymond
Simon Sharwood
6 Nov 2015

Anyone who has been following leaks from agencies such as GCHQ will have had the same thought: if there is a "conspiracy" targeting the leaders of open source, the authors are not a "feminist cabal" but psychologist contractors working for agencies like GCHQ playing dirty tricks.

Take home lesson: open source projects such as Linux and Tor are gradually becoming recognized as threats to the interests of the financial/political elite. This is why every "social disruption" technique in the GCHQ playbook is being directed at our community.

How should we respond? Principally, stay calm. Think strategically and consider a range of scenarios about who might be behind troll campaigns and the possible unwanted consequences of each response being considered. In order to do this effectively, the leadership must stay informed about the latest published leaks indicating what our enemies are up to.

Anonymous

November 07, 2015

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A Tor user reports that a crime drama TV show confused the Tor Network with "dark web" (sometimes used as a synonym for "hidden services") or "deep web" (sometimes used as a synonym for non-intentionally public files exposed on internet connected servers):

https://lists.torproject.org/pipermail/tor-talk/2015-November/039434.ht…

My first thought was that it may be more important to protest abuses of the internet by the real NCIS. For example, "an NCIS agent in Georgia... was using a law-enforcement computer program called RoundUp to search for hashed images of child pornography on computers running the file-sharing network Gnutella", according to this story:

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/09/court-blasts-us-navy-for-sca…
Court blasts US Navy for scanning civilians’ computers for child porn
Every Gnutella user in the state of Washington was checked by the NCIS
David Kravets
15 Sep 2014

This story deserves a followup because I believe CISA legitimizes such Posse-comitatus-violating presumption-of-guilt proceedings.

The tor-talk thread raises the question: should Tor Project organize letters to the editors to networks when their "news segments" or mass media entertainment fictional drama shows make serious misrepresentations of our community?

I think we should consider Ex Dir complaints to media watcher reporters in case of particularly ugly distortions.