Meet The New TorProject.org

Two years ago, we launched our styleguide as our first step in creating a consistent visual look and feel across the entire Tor Project ecosystem. Today, we are very happy to announce the launch of our brand new website.

tor-project-website

Besides bringing more consistency to our visual look, which reinforces community identity and helps us to build user trust by identification, our new website is one part of our goal to ensure that everyone on the planet can use Tor. Last year, we worked hard on making important usability improvements to our browser, including bringing a version of it to Android.

But, it is through our homepage that most people first learn about Tor and decide to download our browser. And our previous site was doing a poor job at that. We had way too much information for a person to consume, and none of it was localized. With that in mind, we decided to redesign it to focus on new users and make it mobile-friendly. Most importantly with our new website, we want Tor Browser to be easy to download and its benefits easy to understand.

We want to make sure that people around the world, using Tor in an array of contexts, can use Tor without barriers. Tor Browser itself is available in 24 different languages, but our website isn’t. With this refresh, torproject.org is now available in 7 different languages: English, German, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, and Russian, and there are more on the way. If you would like to help us with translations, here’s how.

In addition to this update, we are also better organizing all the other content into different portals. For instance, last year we launched our support portal to host all the content related to user support. Coming next will be our community.torproject.org portal that will feature content related to the different ways you can join our community and spread the word about Tor. The portal for all of our free software projects will soon be dev.torproject.org. If you are looking for any content that existed in the old site and is not on the new one, you can access it here.

These efforts are taking the collaboration of many people across Tor teams and the help of dedicated volunteers. We’re very proud to start rolling these changes out.

We are a group of people united by the belief that everyone should have private access to the open web, and we hope our new site makes that easier to achieve.


To give feedback about the website or report an issue, you can create a ticket on trac or email the UX list.

Anonymous

April 04, 2019

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Djdj

Anonymous

April 05, 2019

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Hello: Does the Tor Browser for android allow other apps to connect to Tor since It doesn't rely on Orbit? Thank you.

Anonymous

April 05, 2019

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Thank you so much for making the site worse.
Thank you for being unable to download the expert bundle.
Thanks you very for this idiot change nobody asked for.

1.Constructive criticism is not your thing, is it? You can't suit them all you know. In my opinion it looks cool, all information is still there, usually clicking Documentation will come in helpful. It's in the name..

2. That one is on you, the link is there, accessibility leaves room for improvement tho

3.The change was long overdue. The new simplified design is much more welcoming and less confusing for new users and I appreciate the effort to reach out to non-technical folks by lowering the entry barrier. Tor Browser is not some elitist thing, it's for the masses.

Having said that: Hi torproject, please bring back the signatures on the Download page instead of hiding them anywhere in the documentation, even if newbies are notoriously confused by verifying - I consider that as pretty crucial. To be true, I learned from your site how to verify back in the days when I was new to this stuff.. Doesn't help either that your "How to verify" link points back to the Download page.

Also direct links for the 32bit versions won't hurt.

Plus one to all that.

I support the motivation for the New Look, the outreach, the translation effort, the shift to user-funded Tor Project on the EFF model, and the vision being implemented (with some glitches along the way) by Isabela and Shari before her.

That said, there certainly seems to be overwhelming consensus that the detached signatures are critical, and that checking carefully for issues before going live would be a good procedure for the next iteration of the New Look.

I also think I see a growing consensus that TP's site should be usable with security slider at "safest". How can anyone argue that website authors can make their sites work with "safest" if TP itself is not even trying to achieve that goal?

I hope I also see a growing chorus of voices urging TP to try setting the default Tor Browser security slider to "safest" or at least "safer", urging users to move it as needed.

Official guidance from TP at watching youtube videos using Tor Browser would also be very useful to the huge number of potential TB users who rely on Youtube for all their (mis/dis-)information. Countering hate speech and disinformation, especially state-sponsored disinformation, is a huge problem which TP alone clearly cannot fix.

(It seems so counterintuitive that TB potentially making it safer to visit dodgy sites would help the general population be more aware that the site they are visiting is in fact dodgy that this suggestion probably enjoys some validity!)

> I hope I also see a growing chorus of voices urging TP to try setting the default Tor Browser security slider to "safest" or at least "safer", urging users to move it as needed.

Safest breaks too many websites. Safer is good in most places except for videos. Newbies would have to be trained in NoScript if they want to watch videos all over social media and file-sharing websites. We know it's better for security and privacy, but the stereotype of first-timers is that they think it's unappealing at best, repellent at worst. Maybe Tor Project could find out in their usability studies --- BEFORE switching everything, if you know what I mean.

Anonymous

April 06, 2019

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Where can I download the expert bundle?

I was trying to run tor.exe, but it did not run properly.

The process tor.exe existed, but did nothing...

Anonymous

April 06, 2019

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Gidra.

Anonymous

April 06, 2019

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On the download Languages and Alpha pages, 32-bit is listed first. I think 64-bit should be listed first, and a sentence at the top saying, "If you aren't sure, then you probably want the 64-bit build."

On the old page, next to the (sig) link was a "What's this?" link to the page explaining how to verify signatures, but there is no help at all on the new sig download pages.

Anonymous

April 07, 2019

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obfs4 anyone else having connection issues with this bridge? all other bridges are working

I wonder if you are erroneously calling the bridge "obfs4" because you are using a built-in bridge from the drop-down menu where it is labeled "obfs4". Is that why? UX developers, take note of that.

TL;DR: TBB developers, as of writing this, all but one of the 27 built-in obfs4 bridge lines are offline in Relay Search. Their last-seen time is either 2019-04-12 02:45:06 or 2019-04-12 03:45:06.

obfs4 is not a bridge. It's a pluggable transport [1][2] protocol obfuscation layer that a bridge can accept. A single bridge may allow connections by one or many types of pluggable transport. Learn more about bridges in the new and old TB manuals.

The old manual leads to a probable solution for you:
"Tor Browser now provides some bridges by default. You can enable these easily. Unfortunately, because these bridges are publicly distributed, it is easy for censors to block some of them, so some of them may not work. In this case, you'll need to locate different bridges."

And the new manual tells how to locate bridges by updated methods:
"Visit https://bridges.torproject.org/ and follow the instructions, or
Email bridges@torproject.org from a Gmail, Yahoo, or Riseup email address"

To find why you are having connection issues with your bridge which may help other people, read your tor log:
Onion icon > Tor network settings > Copy Tor Log To Clipboard > paste in an offline text editor.
You will also see the Copy button when you start TB on the progress bar window if TB fails to connect.

Look for the bridge's nickname, fingerprint, or IP address. Its nickname may be in quotation marks. Its fingerprint and IP are described in the old manual's bridges page. Keep those pieces of information secret!! To see if a bridge is running or offline, go to the Tor Metrics Relay Search website operated by Tor Project:
https://metrics.torproject.org/rs.html
Search for the nickname, fingerprint, or IP address of the bridge, and look for a green or red dot next to its nickname. Scroll down to its history graphs to see when it may have been offline in the past. Search results cannot be found for relays that have been offline for several days.

I repeat, keep your bridge's identifying information secret. It's impossible to see or calculate a bridge's hashed fingerprint in TBB. If I understand correctly, hashed fingerprints would be ok to share, but normal fingerprints or the nickname or IP address are not ok to share. Correct me if I'm wrong.

apertium (see Debian repository) does well with English <-> Spanish <-> Italian/French etc. and you can write a simple shell script to pipe the translations.

This software is not intended to translate between distantly related languages such as English and Russian but I hope that won't stop fearless developers from developing English <-> Polish &c.

Anonymous

April 08, 2019

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does Tor have specific download links for 32 bit & 64 bit or can one use the 64 bit Tor download link on a 32 bit machine?